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Direct dating archaeology

1150 - 1350 Large pueblos, cliff dwellings and towers are the rule. Red, orange and yellow pottery on the rise as black-on-white declines. D 1600 - present During the first part of this era the Spanish military, church and civil domination and rule of the pueblos drives the Pueblo religion underground.

direct dating archaeology-77

that lived on the fringes of human society scavenging scraps may be the ancestor of early dog breeds. Plain pottery and gray with neck bands predominate; there is some black-on-white and decorated redware. Small blocks of above-ground masonry rooms and a kiva make up a typical pueblo. Above-ground construction is generally of jacal or crude masonry. 900 - 1150 There are Great Houses, great kivas and roads in some areas.Dogs may have "self-domesticated" when they started scavenging waste from the human settlements that began to appear at this time.For any animal to succeed in such a niche, it would have to be comfortable living and eating in close proximity to humans, as an animal that feared them would not be able to survive in human settlements and would return to living away from people.During their absence, treasured articles and reserve supplies of food were cached in storage pits or cists, excavated in the dry floors of caves.

were used not only for storage, but also as sepulchers, in which the dead were buried with accompanying mortuary offerings.

The Anasazi culture is believed to have gradually evolved out of a nonagricultural base of the ancient Desert culture, once widespread in western North America, though precise evidence of the transition has yet to be discovered. 50 These early Anasazi camped in the open or lived in caves seasonally. Most of the traditional Anasazi villages in the Four Corners Area are abandoned by 1300. However, the resilient and resourceful Pueblo still live and maintain their thousands-of-years-old culture.

have been in part derived from the Mogollon culture, an older tradition of settled agriculturalists and ceramics producers who flourished from c.100 b.c. 1400 in the mountain areas of east central Arizona and west central New Mexico. Hunters used stone-tipped spears and knives, atlatl and dart or spear, and hunted deer, bighorn sheep and antelope. During this period they increasingly relied on cultivated gardens of corn and squash, but no beans. had begun by this time to cultivate squash and a type of maize.

At the time of its greatest extent, the Anasazi culture was spread over most of New Mexico, northern Arizona, southwestern Colorado, and much of Utah.

This is a region comparable in size to modern France, but great uninhabited stretches lay between the villages, which were located where water was available.

The remains of domestic dogs have been found in many archaeological sites in Arizona.